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Myths, Stories and Legends Surrounding the British Virgin Islands

November 8, 2018

Stories, myths and legends about a certain place come in all shapes, forms and sizes. Some depict an origin, the beginning of its civilization, while others are tales to scare naughty kids into submission. While there will be a never-ending debate as to whether these folklores hold some truth, they maintain an interesting fact and a big question mark. It will intrigue, baffle and tickle the imagination, and for those who seek the truth, another adventure waiting to be discovered.

The British Virgin Islands is no stranger to legends and stories. With more than 50 islands under her belt, there is no question that it holds several supernatural tales of creatures and eccentric individuals that once called it home. To some extent, we can believe some of these stories, although there will also be those that are too farfetched. Be that as it may, they have made the BVI what it is now: a cluster of islands riddled with mystery as well as one of the most sought-after tourists and sailing destinations in the world.

One popular story is the tale of the British Isle Mermaids. According to those in the know, two mermaids, Sade and Cassidy once lived off the coast of the BVI sometime in the 1800s. Natives of the island who lived during that time said that these two were never apart, and “active years of sighting were 1807-1828.

Sade and Cassidy were thought to be best friends, although some say that they are polar opposites of each other, with Sade being of African descent and Cassidy a Caucasian. English Alexander Foster claimed to have seen the mermaids and when he asked for their names, Sade and Cassidy answered for each other. Their gentle exploits simmered sometime in 1826-1827, although local boaters still see “unusual things” in the sea that surrounds the British Virgin Islands.

Of course, one cannot discount the tales of pirates that once sailed the Caribbean. Its islands would have been the perfect place for pirates to stash their loots and rest after days of plundering. They could have inhabited one of the islands and hide from rivals, hide from authorities, restock their supplies and many more.

Among the many chunks of lands, Normal Island is told to have been named after Captain Norman, a known pirate back in the day. Unfortunately, his exploits were cut short after Spanish Guarda Costas captured and hanged him.

 

Another is Bellamy Cay, which came from “Black Sam” Bellamy, a notorious seafarer who once captured over 50 vessels. He used the islet, which was then called Blanco Islet “as his base of operation” and relied on the sea as a means of protection.

Another is Bellamy Cay, which came from “Black Sam” Bellamy, a notorious seafarer who once captured over 50 vessels. He used the islet, which was then called Blanco Islet “as his base of operation” and relied on the sea as a means of protection.

Then there’s the ever-popular Blackbeard. Tales of his (mis)adventures are known all over the world, and the BVI carries some of it. Blackbeard was also known to have carried the name Edward Teach, Tatch, and Thatch. This might draw a line along the BVI coast since it has two islands with a “Thatch” suffix: Great Thatch and Little Thatch.

 

There is no harm in believing these tales or to simply consider it as mere stories. These will only make the British Virgin Islands more interesting to some people. Sailing through their waters and taking a stroll on one of their islands come with a sense of thrill that once upon a time, pirates and mermaids came in and came out just like normal people.  

 

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